Thomas* Lovelady, Sr

Male 1700 - Aft 1772  (> 73 years)


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  • Name Thomas* Lovelady, Sr 
    Suffix Sr 
    Born 1700  Of, Burlington Co, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Other-Begin 22 Oct 1760  St. Pauls Parish, Hanover Co. Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • 1760 Oct 22 - Thomas Lovelatty and David Hix were given letters of administrations of the estate of Henry Hix. deceased. The inventory was returned 22 April 1761. A Henry Hix had land in St. Pauls Parish, Hanover County. Virginia in 1734 (Hanover Co Va Court Records 1733-35 pg 61, by Rosalie E Davis)

      Vol. 2, p. 336
      Inventory of estate & sale of HENRY HIX returned by Thomas Lovelatty & DAVID HIX


      Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Rowan Co., NC 1753-1762
      abstracted by Jo White Linn from microfilm

      Vol. 2, p. 302
      22 October 1760. Ordered P Cur that Thomas Lovelatty & DAVID HIX have Letters of Administration All and Singular the Goods and Chattles Rights & Credits of HENRY HIX decsd Securities Joseph Teate, John Mcguire & John Parker in the
      Penalty of 200 Pro. money paid. No letters.
    Other-Begin 22 Apr 1761  St. Pauls Parish, Hanover Co. Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • 1760 Oct 22 - Thomas Lovelatty and David Hix were given letters of administrations of the estate of Henry Hix. deceased. The inventory was returned 22 April 1761.
    Died Aft 1772  of, Rowan Co, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • from Karl Kiser: Thomas as John's father is assumed because he is the person who arrives in western NC about 1750 but I have family stories of brothers immigrating to America which may confuse the issue.

      from Gayle Coberly (coberly@apex2000.net) - via Sharon Long

      Among the first white settlers at Barnegat New Jersey was a Thomas Lovelady. There is an island in that area named Lovelady. The will of John Wright of Burlington County, New Jersey was inventoried by the executors on July 2. 1736 and named on a list of dubious debtors was Thomas Lovelatty "who ran away". (Calendar of NJ Wills and Adm. 1730-1750 Cononial History of the Sate of NJ 1st series Vol.II pg 549. In 1735. Thomas Lovelatty, Esq. appears on the ledger of Partridge's Store in Hanover Co.. Va. Thomas Lovelatty, Esq. appears in North Carolina records in 1749 when on the 11th day of October he was qualified as one of the Justices of the Peace for Granville Co., NC. In 1752 he was appointed Vestryman St Matthew's Parish, Orange Co.

      During the period (1753-1767) a road was laid out from Lovelatty's Mill on the Dan River to Salisbury. (The Rowan Story by James S. Brawley from Pat Clemons)

      The minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of Rowan County show:
      (Abstracts of the Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1753-1762. by Jo White Linn 1977)
      1753 Thomas Loveletty was member of the court and was appointed Commissioner in Wm Carrol's district.
      1754 James Boyd vs Thomas Lovelatty (Minutes of Orange Co Court)
      1754 3 July Thomas Lovelatty witnessed the Rowan County deed of Robert Jones. Jr.. to Anthony Hampton. (Abstracts of Deeds of Rowan Co NC by Jo White Linn p4)
      1754 9 Oct 1754 A land survey for Thomas Lovelatty of Orange County, NC. (see May 11, 1757 below) chain carriers were William Lovelatty and Marshall Lovelatty.
      1755 13 March This land is identified on a deed of Wm. Churton as being on Great Troublesome Creek and the North Fork of the Haw River. His land "to begin at Loveletty's corner".

      Miles Y Bridges, a professional genealogist who searched North Carolina records for a group of Lovelady researchers in 1981, states, "It appears that Thomas Lovelatty lived generally within a few miles from Reidville. N.C. in the present day Rockingham County. This would have placed him at the time of formation of Orange County appoximately on the Orange-Anson County line which became Orange-Rowan County line in 1753."
      1755 James Cook vs Thomas Lovelatt
      James Paine vs. Thomas Lovelatty (Minutes of Orange Co Court)
      1755 Thomas Lovelatty sued and lost a case against John Brantly and Richard Harris. church wasrens of St. John's Parish.
      Granville County (Court Minutes of Granville Co. NC 1746-1820 by Z.H. Gwynn)
      1755 Thomas Lovelatty, Snr with two sons and Thomas Lovelatty, Jr. are on the 1755 tax list of Orange County. The list is not alphabetical and they are listed separately with Thos. Jr., next to Ephraim Potter. (A Wm Marshall is also listed)
      1755 21 Oct court ordered that a road be cut and cleared from Mr Watson's Mill to Mr Tait's. Ten feet wide and from thence to the Best and Nearest landing and closing Dan River at Lovelety's Foard and thence to Mr. Russell's Mill.. (Court of Pleas and Quarter Sess.by Linn)
      1756 24 Jan. John Moss was appointed Commissioner in the Room of Thomas Loveletty.(ibid)
      1756 Wm Eaton vs. Thomas Lovelatty
      Thomas Lovelatty vs. Moses Chapman (Minutes of Orange Co Court)
      1756 Moses Lovelatta sued Moses Campbell.
      1757 Thomas Lovelatty sued Moses Campbell.
      1757 Thomas Lovelatty, Jr., was appointed constable in the "Upper part of Orange County. " (Orange County Court Minutes)
      1757 May 11 Thomas Lovelatty of Orange County, N.C. parish of St Matthew. was granted 584 acres "lying on both sides on the North Fork of Haw River." This is the same land surveyed above 9 Oct 1754.
      1758 William Persons vs Thomas Lovelatty (Minutes of Orange Co. Court)
      1758 November Thomas Lovelittle was awarded sixteen shillings in payment for provisions for the Indians. (Colonial Records of N.C. V. IV p 980 Raleigh 1886)
      1759 Thomas Lovelaty and Marshall Lovelatty were ordered to "Lay out a road near Pinson's Ferry on the Dan River to John Cunningham's Road on Haw River that leads to Salisbury. " (Orange County Court Minutes. Shields)
      1760 22 Oct Thomas Lovelatty and David Hix were given letters of administrations of the estate of Henry Hix. deceased. The inventory was returned 22 April 1761. A Henry Hix had land in St. Pauls Parish, Hanover County. Virginia in 1734 (Hanover Co Va Court Records 1733-35 pg 61, by Rosalie E Davis)
      1762 Thomas Hart & Co. vs Marshall Lovelatty (Minutes of Orange Co Court)
      1763 Middleton Brashears vs Thomas Lovelatty, Sr. petition (ibid)
      Middleton Brashears vs. John Lovelatty debt (ibid)
      Middleton Brashears vs. Marshall Lovelatty (ibid)
      1764 Bathena Perins. exec. vs Marshall Lovelatty (ibid)
      1766 Thomas Lovelatty was granted 400 acres on Indian Camp Creek, a fork of Abitton's Creek.
      1767 John Loveletty was given three grants totaling 650 acres in the same watershed.
      1768 Marshall Lovelatty was given a grant of 200 acres adjoining Thomas (NC. Land Grants in SC by Brent Holcomb 1980)

      The foregoing grants were in Mecklinburg Co. NC at the time. There were numerous references made to Abitton's Creek (various spellings). Abington's Creek (sometimes called Greasy Creek) is in SW Caldwell County. On an 1850 Burke County, N.C. map Lovelady Ford is found on the Catawaba River crossing from present day Caldwell Country to Burke County. There is a Lovelady Road nearby. Caldwell County was formed in 1841 from Burke and Wilkes Counties. Burke was formed in 1777 from Rowan County. Apparently the Broad River referred to in these deeds was the "Second Broad River" and is now the Catawba.

      1769 15 Dec. Isaac Parker land grant on Allison's Creek, water of the Broad River adj. Thomas Lovelatty. (Tryon Co. NC Land Warrants 1768-74)
      1770 Thomas Lovelatty sold 200 acres of his 1766 grant to Marshall (for L5[5 pounds] proclamation money.
      1771 23 Oct Marshall Lovelatty sold to John Lovelatty the above land for L20[20 pounds] proc. money.
      1772 Thomas Lovelatty and his wife Hanna sold 200 acres on Indian Camp Creek to Robert McMullen. (Deed Abst. of Tryon. Lincoln and Rutherford Counties, NC 1769-86. Holcomb)
      1772 A land survey was made to establish the line between North and South Carolina. This placed some lands granted in North Carolina into South Carolina and the landowners were to turn in their grants and apply to South Carolina for new ones. Otherwise the land would be declared vacant and granted to anyone who applied for it.
      1775 Marshall and John signed a declaration asking the King for relief. (See notes: Marshall Lovelady)
      We do not know if Marshall and John received new grants or turned in their old ones. They were in Green Co. Tn by 1780
      1789 Lewis Atkins sold to John Hughes Marshall's original grant of "200 acres on Abiton's Creek Waters of the Broad River. bounded by Thomas Lovelatty. Whether this means that Thomas Lovelatty was still living there. or if is the description of the original grant is not clear.
      1803 17 June A Hannah Lovelady witnessed the will of George Allen in the Greenville Dist. of SC. (A Collection of Upper South Carolina Genealogical and Family Records by James E Wooley Vol.1)

      Misc. notes from the Lovelady "Mafia" research group
      Thomas Lovelady Jr and Leah his wife
      John Lovelady is shown in the Newberry Co SC census 96 District 1790 1 adult male
      1800 Pendleton Dist SC 5 children - older- no wife
      Simon Lovelady is shown in Newberry Co SC census 1 adult male
      1800 Pendleton Dist he is 45+ with 6 children (young)
      ============================================================
      descendancy chart and genforum discussion:
      http://genforum.genealogy.com/lovelady/messages/233.html


      ===========================================================
      http://www.angelfire.com/me4/s_davis/pafn07.htm

      Possible mentions of Thomas Sr. prior to 1750 in NC. (note: several variation of the spelling of Lovelady) A will of John Wright 1732, Burlington County, N. J. In 1736 executors note a debt by Thomas Lovelatty (an indentured servants) "who ran away" See Colonial History of the State of New Jersey 1st series, vll, p549. Thomas Lovelety on ledger of Partridge store in Hanover, VA 1735. See "Accounts of the store of Thomas Partridge & Co., Hanover County, VA 1734-56" by Richard Slatten and James Bagby in Magazine of Virginia Genealogy. There are family stories which refer to several brothers coming to America and that they may have been indentured servants (see the "ran away" quote in the NJ records.) Although it is a reasonable assumption there is no proof that all Lovelady's (Marshall, John, Thomas Jr., etc.) are directly descended from this Thomas (NC 1750.) The IGI and a few other sources suggest that the English countryside north of Liverpool (Lanchashire County and possibly Cumbria) would be good places to research the Lovelady name." Note: The majority of the information for Lovelady Generation #1 and beyond comes from a variety of posts found online. These should be checked carefully against any available documentation. This line begins with Thomas Lovelady who appears in western North Carolina before 1750. His grandson, John Lovelady, Jr., marries into the Hughes line (Clarissa Hughes.) Members of the Wear line married into the Lovelady line. Other names that seem to be associated with the Lovelady's and bear further research are Carter, Wilkinson, Vanhooser, Wicher/Witcher and Morgan.
      In 1753 fourteen Justices of the Peace for Rowan County, NC: Walter Carruth, John Brandon, Thomas Lovelatty, James Carter, Thomas Cook, Squire Boone (father of Daniel Boone), Thomas Potts, George Smith, John Habley (Hanby), James Tate, Andrew Allison, Alexander Osborne, John Brevard, and Alexander Cathey, names which appeared as friends and neighbors on legal instruments for generations. Justices of the Peace at that time in history were a representative of a large area and served much as our present day Judges and Representatives Ruth Herndon Shields, Orange County, N.C. Abstracts of the Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of: Sept. 1752-Aug. 1766 (Greenville, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, Inc., 1991). The index shows 17 entries for LOVELATTA, LOVELATTY, John, Marshal, Moses, Thomas, Thomas Jr..The earliest reference we have of Lovelady in America is Lovelady, a village south of Old Barnegat Light in New Jersey, Ocean Co, New Jersey, named after its original owner who tradition says, was a well-to-do Englishman of the early 18th centry. Tradition aslo suggests that Loveladies Island in the same area was named for a person who received it as a grant from the King of England. Barnegat derives its name from the inlet, which was originally called Barende-gat by the Dutch discoverers on our coast. Barnende-gat, meaning an inlet with breakers, was subsequently corrupted by the Engilsh to Barndegat and finally to Barnegat. Among the first white settlers who settled at Barnegat and vicinity, were Thomas Timms, Elisha Parr, Thomas Lovelady, Jonas Tow, and a man named Vaull. The first settlers seem generally to have located on the upland near the meadows, but the nearby island has the name of Lovelady. Many will point out that none of the first settlers of Barnegat tarried for long except Jonas Tow (he built a house as early as 1720), who it is said, died before he could get away. Some of the early settlers were salt- makers, indicating salt marshes which also bread mosquitoes. Perhaps this was the reason they did not linger long in the area. The will of John Wright of New Jersey Burlington County, New Jersey, was probated in 1732. There were numerous debts owed to him. On 2 Jul 1736, the executors produced an inventory of the estate. On the list of dubious debts was Thomas Lovelatty "who ran away." The next chrological mention of Thomas Lovelety is in 1735 when his name appears on the ledger of Partridge's Store in Virginia Hanover County. His name appears on the ledger of Capt. Charles Hudson "pd Thomas Lovelety 1 sack of salt". Thomas Lovelatty Esq. first appears in North Carolina, Granville County, in 1749 when on the 11th day of Oct the justices of Granville County were ordered to qualify him as Justice of the peace for the County. In 1752 Thomas Loveletter was appointed Vestryman St. Matthew's Parish, Orange County. ***came from notes of Mary Ehlers and Wilma Baldwin Moore. In 1753 fourteen Justices of the Peace for Rowan County, NC: Walter Carruth, John Brandon, Thomas Lovelatty, James Carter, Thomas Cook, Squire Boone (father of Daniel Boone), Thomas Potts, George Smith, John Habley (Hanby), James Tate, Andrew Allison, Alexander Osborne, John Brevard, and Alexander Cathey, names which appeared as friends and neighbors on legal instruments for generations. Justices of the Peace at that time in history were a representative of a large area and served much as our present day Judges and Representatives Ruth Herndon Shields, Orange County, N.C. Abstracts of the Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of: Sept. 1752-Aug. 1766 (Greenville, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, Inc., 1991). The index shows 17 entries for LOVELATTA, LOVELATTY, John, Marshal, Moses, Thomas, Thomas Jr.. 9. Hannah was born about 1700.

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      Possible mentions of Thomas Sr. prior to 1750 in NC.

      A will of John Wright 1732, Burlington County, N. J.

      In 1736 executors note a debt by Thomas Lovelatty (an indentured servant) "who ran away" See Colonial History of the State of New Jersey 1st series, vll, p549.

      Thomas Lovelety on ledger of Partridge store in Hanover, VA 1735. See "Accounts of the store of Thomas Partridge & Co., Hanover County, VA 1734-56" by Richard Slatten and James Bagby in Magazine of Virginia Genealogy.

      There are family stories which refer to several brothers coming to America and that they may have been indentured servants (see the "ran away" quote in the NJ records.) Although it is a reasonable assumption there is no proof that all Lovelady's (Marshall, John, Thomas Jr., etc.) are directly descended from this Thomas (NC 1750.)

      The IGI and a few other sources suggest that the English countryside north of Liverpool (Lanchashire County and possibly Cumbria) would be good places to research the Lovelady name."

      Note: The majority of the information for Lovelady Generation #1 and beyond comes from a variety of posts found online. These should be checked carefully against any available documentation.

      This line begins with Thomas Lovelady who appears in western North Carolina before 1750. His grandson, John Lovelady, Jr., marries into the Hughes line (Clarissa Hughes.) Members of the Wear line married into the Lovelady line. Other names that seem to be associated with the Lovelady's and bear further research are Carter, Wilkinson, Vanhooser, Wicher/Witcher and Morgan.
      (note by Michele Henkel:

    Person ID I1782  Roots
    Last Modified 7 Apr 2013 

    Family Hannah* Hix,   b. Abt 1700,   d. Aft 1761, of, Rowan Co, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 62 years) 
    Married Abt 1723  North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Thomas Lovelady, Jr,   b. 1725,   d. 1783, Guilford Co, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
    +2. William Lovelady,   b. 1728,   d. Aft 1774  (Age > 47 years)
     3. Moses Lovelady,   b. 1731,   d. Aft 1752  (Age > 22 years)
    +4. Marshall Lovelady,   b. 1735, Orange Co, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jan 1793, Jefferson Co, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
    +5. John* Lovelady, (son?),   b. 1736, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1790  (Age 55 years)
    +6. Jesse Lovelady,   b. Abt 1738,   d. Aft 1782  (Age ~ 45 years)
     7. Samuel Lovelady,   b. Abt 1740,   d. Aft 1741  (Age ~ 2 years)
    Last Modified 10 Feb 2011 
    Family ID F752  Group Sheet